yourshouldersaretheperfectsea:

Hey everyone, 

So my friend and I have decided to develop a period tracker app because we both realized most on the market are awful.
We want to make have fertility predictions, birth control options (reminders to take your BC pill, etc), and be gender neutral.

It would be really helpful to us to have your input!

So, is there anything you hate about period tracker apps or anything you wish they had included?

amanda you’re an ovary-achiever

(seriously though, boosting this. talk to her. she’s nice.)

scanzen:

Particle Tracks On Film from the Fermilab Bubble Chamber.

thereconstructionists:

English mathematician and writer Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815–November 27, 1852), born Augusta Ada Byron as the only legitimate child to the poet Lord Byron and better-known as Ada Lovelace, is commonly considered the world’s first computer programmer — a title she earned by writing the very first algorithm designed to be processed by a machine during her work on Charles Babbage’s seminal Analytical Engine, the early theoretical general-purpose computer that laid the foundation of modern computing.
Abandoned by her father when she was barely a few months old and half-orphaned by Lord Byron’s death when Ada was only eight, Lovelace was led to mathematics and logic by her mother, who saw these strictly rational disciplines as an antidote to the madness she feared Ada had inherited from her father. But even as Lovelace came to indulge her mathematical mind, she insisted on referring to herself as a “poetical scientist.”
Still in her twenties, she was enlisted by Babbage in translating Italian mathematician Louis Menebrea’s memoir of the Analytical Engine, originally published in French. It was in the elaborate notes on the book, which she penned during a nine-month period in 1842-1843, that Lovelace wrote the algorithm which staked out her corner of history.
Lovelace was in many ways a rebel of her era: Though she and her mother inhabited the upper echelons of London society, women’s participation in intellectual affairs was both uncommon and discouraged. Even among the gentlemen who pursued such disciplines as geology, astronomy, and botany, there were no professional scientists per se — in fact, the very word “scientist” didn’t exist until William Whewell coined it in 1836. And yet Lovelace, a woman, was very much a scientist — in addition to being the mother of three children — and an intellectual peer of Babbage’s.
But besides a pioneer of computer science, Lovelace, whose eclectic interests spanned from music to mesmerism, was also in a way one of the world’s first neuroscientists — at least a theoretical one. In 1844, she grew intensely interested in creating “a calculus of the nervous system,” confiding in her friend Woronzow Greig a desire to develop a mathematical model for consciousness that would explain how nerve signals give rise to thoughts and feelings in the brain. But, largely due to her mother’s instilled admonitions about Ada’s inherited capacity for madness, she eventually abandoned the quest.
Lovelace died of uterine cancer, after a short battle terribly managed by her physicians, two weeks short of her thirty-seventh birthday. She is commemorated with one of London’s famous blue plates, located at St. James’s Square and inscribed “Ada Countess of Lovelace 1815-1852 Pioneer of Computing lived here.” Her contribution to modern life is imprinted on every interaction we have with a machine on any given day.
Learn more: Wikipedia | The Bride of Science (2000 biography)

thereconstructionists:

English mathematician and writer Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace (December 10, 1815–November 27, 1852), born Augusta Ada Byron as the only legitimate child to the poet Lord Byron and better-known as Ada Lovelace, is commonly considered the world’s first computer programmer — a title she earned by writing the very first algorithm designed to be processed by a machine during her work on Charles Babbage’s seminal Analytical Engine, the early theoretical general-purpose computer that laid the foundation of modern computing.

Abandoned by her father when she was barely a few months old and half-orphaned by Lord Byron’s death when Ada was only eight, Lovelace was led to mathematics and logic by her mother, who saw these strictly rational disciplines as an antidote to the madness she feared Ada had inherited from her father. But even as Lovelace came to indulge her mathematical mind, she insisted on referring to herself as a “poetical scientist.”

Still in her twenties, she was enlisted by Babbage in translating Italian mathematician Louis Menebrea’s memoir of the Analytical Engine, originally published in French. It was in the elaborate notes on the book, which she penned during a nine-month period in 1842-1843, that Lovelace wrote the algorithm which staked out her corner of history.

Lovelace was in many ways a rebel of her era: Though she and her mother inhabited the upper echelons of London society, women’s participation in intellectual affairs was both uncommon and discouraged. Even among the gentlemen who pursued such disciplines as geology, astronomy, and botany, there were no professional scientists per se — in fact, the very word “scientist” didn’t exist until William Whewell coined it in 1836. And yet Lovelace, a woman, was very much a scientist — in addition to being the mother of three children — and an intellectual peer of Babbage’s.

But besides a pioneer of computer science, Lovelace, whose eclectic interests spanned from music to mesmerism, was also in a way one of the world’s first neuroscientists — at least a theoretical one. In 1844, she grew intensely interested in creating “a calculus of the nervous system,” confiding in her friend Woronzow Greig a desire to develop a mathematical model for consciousness that would explain how nerve signals give rise to thoughts and feelings in the brain. But, largely due to her mother’s instilled admonitions about Ada’s inherited capacity for madness, she eventually abandoned the quest.

Lovelace died of uterine cancer, after a short battle terribly managed by her physicians, two weeks short of her thirty-seventh birthday. She is commemorated with one of London’s famous blue plates, located at St. James’s Square and inscribed “Ada Countess of Lovelace 1815-1852 Pioneer of Computing lived here.” Her contribution to modern life is imprinted on every interaction we have with a machine on any given day.

morethanamomentintime:

charlesoberonn:

If you disrespect women in the tech industry, the angry spirits of Ada Lovelace, the world’s first computer programmer, and Grace Hopper, the creator of the first compiler, will delete all the commenting from someone’s code just before you have to debug it.

http://www.smbc-comics.com/?id=2516#comic

<3

I wrote a thing.

ehmeegee:

We need more voices in science
to step up in defiance for those characters 
that get erased from our stories; accolades and glories granted to counterparts 
as though we didn’t have the smarts to achieve 
the impossible, believe in the improbable 
and create the unthinkable. 
It’s unthinkable to me that our hindsight is so blinded. 
Turning the cheek too many times makes me think you’re shaking your head:
no, no, no. 

"Hey - you look good in that dress today." 
Pay no mind to the mess that comment made 
of my self-confidence. It seems pretty obvious 
the words they think are innocuous are noxious, 
breeding doubt and insecurity, feeding bouts of fury in me
as I hear the same phrases repeated to the women in my classes,
our lab mates and the masses of budding genius minds
that yearn to focus on their hypotheses and methods 
but instead they’re distracted by those words left unretracted: 
"you look good in that dress today."

If you tell her that she’s pretty before you tell her that she’s smart,
don’t be startled when she starts to parcel out and pull apart 
her individuality. Trading physics books for glossy magazines. 
Instead of figuring fifty ways to solve differentials she’s counting up 
fifty ways to potentially please her partner, 
wondering - is this what is appealing? this feeling of cheapening my intelligence
because we’re terrified to be marginalized for tying to have it all,
all the while face burning, yearning tears not to drip drop while your stomach flip flops
at being called out for a love of learning. 

Just between us, from one woman to another 
it’ll take a while to recover while we wonder without ignorance
why there are so many instances of being told to be a mother
before we’re told to be discoverers. 
And I hope in twenty years or maybe less 
we’ll be blessed with plenty of reassurances that our work
is recognized for its significance, and the difference is 
we’ll be standing up for our accomplishments - not alone but with accomplices within our fields. 
Our fields. 
And it won’t be such a novelty to be so proudly standing up for our beliefs
and our discoveries. 
We need more voices in science, and not those that just say, hey- 
You look good in that dress today. 

—- 8/27/14

yes.

badsciencejokes:

The rotation of Earth really makes my day!

acodetojoy:

unproventheorem:

Found these cards.

Frowned.

Fixed them.

Smiled.

Geekery prevails!

i want to frame these and put them on the wall.

dveon:

trying to make new friends

image

my life

Thinking of (finally) joining the smartphone world. How do people decide which phone to get?!! What’s good, technology world?!

collababortion:

shimmerandfadeaway:

nodamncatnodamncradle:

burningbrooklynbridges:

grown. ass. men.
you scared she gonna strike out yr precious baby boy? OH TOO LATE.

they were doing a special on her on one of the news channels at the gym. i didnt have the headphones so i couldnt hear the story, but one of the photos they showed was of a little girl in the crowd holding up a sign that said “I want to throw like a girl.” For every pathetic, insecure grown man who is threatened by this amazingly talented girl, hopefully there is another little girl who is inspired. But that she has to put up wit this kind of abuse even though she is OBJECTIVELY the best pitcher in the league right now and can throw a ball SEVENTY MILES PER HOUR is absolutely uncalled for. She is truly phenomenal, and those dads can all go eat shit and live

Go on with your bad self

I love that, in a brief interview I got to see, she stated that her main goal was to have more girls play ball so that “we could maybe get our own locker room.” Like, that’s all she wanted, and then she went back to talking about how winning is a TEAM effort and that the reporter should interview the rest of the team, too.I LOVE THIS ONE.

collababortion:

shimmerandfadeaway:

nodamncatnodamncradle:

burningbrooklynbridges:

grown. ass. men.

you scared she gonna strike out yr precious baby boy? OH TOO LATE.

they were doing a special on her on one of the news channels at the gym. i didnt have the headphones so i couldnt hear the story, but one of the photos they showed was of a little girl in the crowd holding up a sign that said “I want to throw like a girl.” For every pathetic, insecure grown man who is threatened by this amazingly talented girl, hopefully there is another little girl who is inspired. But that she has to put up wit this kind of abuse even though she is OBJECTIVELY the best pitcher in the league right now and can throw a ball SEVENTY MILES PER HOUR is absolutely uncalled for. She is truly phenomenal, and those dads can all go eat shit and live

Go on with your bad self

I love that, in a brief interview I got to see, she stated that her main goal was to have more girls play ball so that “we could maybe get our own locker room.” Like, that’s all she wanted, and then she went back to talking about how winning is a TEAM effort and that the reporter should interview the rest of the team, too.
I LOVE THIS ONE.

(Source: kingjaffejoffer)

scienceyoucanlove:

inmytsinelas:

Oops, I made a thing.

this website

yourshouldersaretheperfectsea

scienceyoucanlove:

inmytsinelas:

Oops, I made a thing.

this website

yourshouldersaretheperfectsea

goto-blog:

#Programming in movies vs. programming in real life

(Source: vine.co)

lwamfhmartiboxdotty9:

It’s been 6 generations and this guy is still tripping balls over science and technology.